2019 Annual Conference

Resources for Staff at All Levels of Your Agency

For the first time since 2016, over 300 Community Action leaders and Self-Sufficiency Award winners from across the Commonwealth will converge in Harrisburg for two full days of learning, networking, and celebrating the achievements of our families and the staff who supported them along the way from poverty to financial stability. The Community Action Association of Pennsylvania’s Annual Conference is the largest training and networking event the association hosts. It features nationally known keynote speakers, 20 workshop sessions, networking opportunities, an exhibit hall, and the Self-Sufficiency Awards.

The CAAP annual Self-Sufficiency Awards is held in conjunction with the conference. Each year, the association’s Self-Sufficiency Awards recognize the significant accomplishments of the award winners while showcasing how Community Action Agencies support a person's journey toward financial stability. The SSA ceremony is the highlight of the conference. Our award recipients share their stories, in-person and in their own words, about what their journey back to financial stability was like and how Community Action supported them along the way. Their stories reveal deeper societal trends that keep many citizens in this country from prospering. Our families’ successes are revealing and inspiring. This year, the SSA ceremony will be an evening reception that includes dinner, a nationally recognized keynote speaker, family portraits taken by our very own LensCAAP photographers, and of course the awards ceremony itself.

The word RENEWAL inspires multiple meanings to CAAP.

For the past two years, CAAP had the joy of teaming up with the Pennsylvania Association of Nonprofit Organizations (PANO) and the Alliance for Nonprofit Resources (ANR) to host a collaborative conference. However, to provide a deeper dive into Community Action specific educational content, CAAP decided to RENEW its standalone annual conference.

We also know that the mission of reducing poverty in our local communities is a MONUMENTAL responsibility. In order to keep our energy and inspiration high, it’s important to converge once a year as a Community Action family in order to RENEW our passion for another year of strengthening communities and families.

Finally, to us, RENEWAL represents hope and a new beginning, attributes that benefit Community Action clients, staff, and every citizen of our communities. We look forward to seeing our Community Action family each year at the annual conference because it RENEWS our spirit for serving Community Action’s purpose of building a nation that creates opportunities for all people to thrive.

Community Action changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live. We care about the entire community, and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.

Dates and Location

Tuesday, October 8 (Pre-Conference), Wednesday, October 9, and Thursday, October 10, 2019. Sheraton/Marriott Harrisburg Hershey Hotel: 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, PA, 17111

Registration

Registration is now closed. Registration options and prices are:

  • Pre-Conference Roundtables: Work Ready, Finance, Development/Communications, Human Resources - FREE!
  • Pre-Conference Workshop: The History of Community Action with David Bradley – $100.00
  • Full Conference Registration (Includes SSA Ceremony) – $380.00
  • Day 1 Registration Only (October 9 - Includes SSA Ceremony) – $275.00
  • Day 2 Registration Only (October 10) – $170.00
  • Self-Sufficiency Awards Ceremony Only (October 9, 6pm - 8pm) – $45.00

Sleeping Room Reservation

CLICK HERE to book your sleeping room. You can also call 717-565-3328 and tell the representative that the name of your event is "CAAP Oct 2019 Fall Conference". Conference hotel rates are $125/room. The cut-off date to book your sleeping room at the $125 rate is September 17th. Hotel location is the Sheraton/Marriott Harrisburg Hershey Hotel: 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, PA, 17111 

Program Overview

Keynote Speakers

  • Caylin Moore - A Dream Too Big: The Story of an Improbable Journey from Compton to Oxford

    In this inspiring keynote, drawn from his acclaimed book A Dream Too Big: The Story of an Improbable Journey from Compton to Oxford, Caylin Moore shares his against-all-odds journey from the cruel poverty of gang-ridden Los Angeles to becoming a Rhodes Scholar attending Oxford University. Caylin’s story is one that  normally would have led him to gangs and prison: a father, convicted of murder; a mother, the victim of sexual assault; a hungry child, kept awake at night by the sounds of gunfire and the scratching of rats and roaches. Instead, by embracing his mother’s steely faith in God and education, he escaped Compton to excel at football and academics. Called "an inspiring tale that should be mandatory reading for every student, parent, and anyone else interested in the success of those who will shape and define our future," Caylin’s story proves that there is no such thing as a dream too big.

    By all rights, Caylin Louis Moore should be dead, in prison, or a gang member. Instead, he’s a Rhodes Scholar, author, speaker, and role model for every kid deprived of hope in downtrodden communities. In his book, A Dream Too Big: The Story of an Improbable Journey from Compton to Oxford, and as an inspirational keynote speaker, Caylin shares the story of his exodus from one of the most impoverished, gang-infested communities in the United States to the golden, dreaming spires of Oxford, England.

    After Moore’s mother gathered her three young children and fled an abusive husband of nine years, leaving behind a comfortable middle-class life, Moore found himself in a bewildering and dangerous environment. The family lived in a neighborhood ruled by the Bloods, and Caylin often lay awake at night, terrified by both the sounds of gunfire outside and the scratching of rats and roaches moving in the walls. When Caylin’s father was convicted of murder and his mother was sexually assaulted in the hospital while recovering from open-heart surgery, he was forced to enter adulthood prematurely. Embracing his mother’s steely faith in God and education, Caylin skirted the gangs and the endemic violence of Compton to excel on the football field and in the classroom.

    Academics and athletics led to college scholarships, which led to a Fulbright and eventually the Rhodes Scholarship. Along the way, Caylin cofounded a student organization that brought college athletes into underserved classrooms as inspirational speakers, role models, and mentors. His eye-opening, inspirational story proves that, contrary to what others told him on his journey, there is no such thing as a dream too big.

  • Dr. Mike Thomson - It’s All About Character

    Dr. Mike will be pulling back the curtain to unleash his best tips, secrets & strategies from his trademarked talks on It’s All About Character and Strategies For Saving Your Sanity. This keynote will Turbo-Charge whatever you’re doing right now and give you the tools for the Right Mindset - Mental Toughness - Lasting Resilience and the Life Balance that leads to Sustainable High Performance at work, home and life.  Fasten your seat belt for a high energy keynote you will not forget!

    For the past 25 years, Dr. Mike Thomson has been described as “A Master of Entertainment Comedy, Fun, and Learning” from small breakout sessions to being the keynoter at international conferences or in his many LIVE radio and television appearances.

    “Dr. Mike” as he is known around the country, has a wide variety of work experience that spans from working in schools, law enforcement, and juvenile courts, as well as a supervisor in the department of Psychology & Psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic, along with directing drug alcohol treatment programs in Minnesota and Ohio….and even the first ever American run drug alcohol treatment program in Europe located outside of Stockholm Sweden.

    He has been the host of two award winning television specials and is the author of twenty books, including his biggest selling book, Strategies For Saving Your Sanity In Parenthood.

    As a result of his accomplishments, Dr. Mike is a highly sought after speaker who has spoken to over 2.5 million people worldwide. He has been an adjunct professor at The Ohio State University and Ashland University. He has spoken to or consulted for virtually every type of public and private sector group. Dr. Mike has spoken to corporations, associations, chambers of commerce, educational groups,  every conceivable type of healthcare and medical group, and virtually every other kind of organization.

    Last, but not least, Dr. Mike has been happily married for over 40 years and is continuing to be raised by her, their adult son, their adult daughter.….and four grandchildren.

Pre-Conference: Tuesday, October 8

  • David Bradley (12:00PM - 5:00PM) - The History of Community Action

    During the October 8th pre-conference, CAAP is hosting a History of Community Action workshop with David Bradley from noon – 5pm. Community Action has a rich, meaningful, and inspiring history dating back to the beginning of the war on poverty. There is no better person to teach the history of Community Action than David Bradley. David’s lifelong career and accomplishments have played a significant impact on Community Action’s history. This workshop is a unique opportunity that anyone working in Community Action should experience. Join David Bradley in this fast-paced, fact fueled and fun afternoon as he explores the history of America’s Community Action programs. This workshop promises to be an afternoon you don’t want to miss!

    Among the dozens of topics discussed, attendees will learn answers to questions such as:

    • Why did America declare a war on poverty?
    • Why did the Community Action program become so controversial?
    • Why has Presidential support changed over the years?
    • How do you define success in Community Action?

    For more than 30 years, David Bradley has been one of Washington’s leading advocates on behalf of low-income programs. In 1981, David helped found the National Community Action Foundation (NCAF). As a private non-profit organization funded solely by non-governmental contributions, NCAF represents funding and policy interests of the nation’s 1000 community action agencies before Congress and the Executive Branch.

    In this role at NCAF, David was the primary architect of the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). Besides the CSBG, David’s legislative activities include Weatherization Assistance, the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, Head Start, and job training programs.

    In an age in which partisan gridlock is too often the norm, David has shown an uncanny ability to make poverty issues a concern to both parties. After facing elimination in the 1995 House Republican’s Contract with America, David was able to work with key House Republican leaders to ensure CSBG funding procured the largest percentage received of any domestic program in FY 1997. In his role at NCAF, David has also helped power CAPLAW, a legal resource center for the Community Action Agencies (CAA) network and CAPPAC, a Political Action Committee.

    In addition, David Bradley has helped foster a unique partnership between the private sector and the CAA network. His work with Exxon-Mobil provided first hand job training to thousands of workers. His development of a graduate program in Community Economic Development at Southern New Hampshire University has allowed numerous students the opportunity to earn a graduate degree affordably.

    Prior to joining NCAF, David worked in Congressional Affairs at the Small Business Administration under President Jimmy Carter.  He has Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from George Washington University. In 1987, he was a Senior Executive Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School at Harvard University.

    He and his wife Nancy reside in Fredericksburg, Virginia. David’s passion for politics and poverty is matched by his interest in reading and baseball. David is part owner of a number of minor league baseball teams including the Albuquerque Isotopes, the Triple-A affiliate of the Colorado Rockies; the Bowie Baysox and the Frederick Keys, both in the Orioles System; and the Biloxi Shuckers who are the Brewers Double-A franchise.

    David’s mentor, Sargent Shriver, perhaps described David’s advocacy best when he wrote “no one has done more to keep the War on Poverty fresh in the hearts and minds of individuals than David Bradley.”

  • Work Ready Roundtable (10:00AM - 12:00PM)
  • Executive Forum Roundtable (10:00AM - 12:00PM)
  • Finance Roundtable (10:00AM - 12:00PM)
  • Development Director Roundtable (10:00AM - 12:00PM)
  • Human Resources Roundtable (10:00AM - 12:00PM)

Session A: Wednesday, October 9, 10:15AM—11:45AM

  • Independent Contractors and Volunteers and Unpaid Interns - Rick Pins

    Instead of traditional “employees,” can your Community Action Agency (CAA) lawfully use independent contractors, volunteers, unpaid interns, or temporary workers? Does your CAA utilize compliant policies and agreements for such individuals? This interactive session will help you unravel the confusing knots that are sometimes created by unclear (and possibly unlawful) relationships between your CAA and various types of workers. In order to comply with the myriad of employment laws and wage regulations, you must first recognize the viable classification options for that individual and then create good documentation that spells out each party’s obligations so that your CAA can avoid (or at least minimize the liability for) misclassification of workers. Of course, you also need to ensure you treat the individual consistent with the terms of the contract at issue – as actual practice will be the critical inquiry in any challenge.

  • Building Your Financial House, Session 1 – Holly Chase-Zugay

    Back by popular demand, we’re pleased to offer an expanded training of Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency’s (PHFA) flagship financial education program, Building Your Financial House. The seven module program is based on the Financial Literacy and Education Commission’s core competencies of financial capability and is currently being used with Family Self-Sufficiency clients, at-risk and incarcerated veterans, and reentrants returning to their communities after incarceration. Participants must register for all three sessions as the training is cumulative. Session 1 addresses visioning success and developing personal assets important to employers, setting financial goals, reading pay statements, and understanding employee benefit that can assist clients in their financial stability and future.

    Holly Chase-Zugay is a financial educator, writer, and presenter specializing in community-based financial education for adults.  She has worked with national, state, and local non-profit organizations and government agencies in the areas of financial education program development, training, outreach, and delivery.  Ms. Zugay has extensive experience with at-risk populations including, low-income families in subsidized housing, homeowners facing foreclosure, veterans transitioning from homelessness, ex-offenders preparing for re-entry, and people with disabilities.

    Ms. Zugay is currently the financial education officer with the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA).   In this capacity, she leads the financial literacy initiatives and training across the organization, including housing counseling and education, housing services, and mortgage servicing divisions.  Ms. Zugay designed PHFA’s flagship financial education program, Building Your Financial House. 

    Ms. Zugay holds a BS degree in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin and is a Certified Financial Planner™ certificant.  She is president of the Speyer Foundation and board member of the Capital Region Ex-offender Support Coalition and The Program, It’s About Change.  Ms. Zugay is the 2018 recipient of the Mary Ellen Edmonson Financial Educator of the Year awarded by the Association of Financial Counseling and Planning Education.

  • #CountMeIn: Making the Census Count for Community Action - Jim Masters and Lindsay Marsh

    The Census is a critical process that affects us all. Census data is used to apportion representation among states, draw congressional and state legislative districts, school districts and voting precincts, enforce voting rights and civil rights legislation, and distribute federal dollars to states (including CSBG, Head Start, Weatherization and many more!). Community Action is playing a key role in making sure that every person is counted! This session will showcase Community Action’s role in ensuring that Hard-To-Count people and communities are included in the Census, and offer concrete tools and training to help front-line staff maximize Census participation.

    Jim Masters is an Expert in the History, Philosophy, Mission, Governance, Programs, Strategies and Management of Community Action Agencies. Mr. Masters knows community action because he has lived it since 1966. He has designed and conducted hundreds of seminars, workshops and Board retreats for CAA’s, OCS, NASCSP, the Partnership and Regional and State CAA and Head Start Associations. Former Interim Executive Director, Community Acton of Ventura County, CA and the   Community Action Agency of San Mateo County, CA.  Subject Matter Expert for the Partnership Learning Community on National Economic Trends. Developed the Economic Analysis Toolkit for CAA’s to use in local community assessments. 

    Lindsay Marsh comes to the Partnership from the Office of Community Service at the US Department of Health and Human Services. Her previous work has taken her across the country working issue and political campaigns, organizing, doing data research, and fundraising. Lindsay is a former small business owner; she co-founded a social media company specializing in online fundraising and social justice work and a liquor distribution company. Long an advocate of civic and social engagement, she is thrilled to work on a project that combines her extensive organizing skills with the real world effects that the census brings to the population the Network serves most.  Lindsay holds a bachelor’s degree in International Affairs and a master’s degree in Political Management, both from the George Washington University. In her spare time, Lindsay is an avid cyclist, runner, and triathlete. She is based out of Denver, Colorado.

  • Intergenerational Poverty Approach, Session 1

    The Garrett County Community Action Motivation for 2-Generation Work 

    We will discuss and identify the reasoning behind making the decision to focus on intentionally serving the
    family as a whole, including the foundation and agency shift that took place and what transpired because of
    the changes. A look at before and after Garrett County Community Action’s change.

Session B: Wednesday, October 9, 1:00PM—2:30PM

  • Hiring and Firing Best Practices – Rick Pins

    The hiring and termination process are both critical junctures in the employment relationship – and rife with risks and potential liabilities for employers. Join us for a discussion on how to maximize the likelihood that your organization is hiring the right person in the first place, and how to end an employment relationship in a way that limits legal exposure. This session will use a series of case studies to demonstrate the importance of following anti-discrimination requirements, preserving the at-will employment relationship, tracking employee performance, properly training managers, and considering potential claims prior to terminating an employee.

  • Building Your Financial House, Session 2 – Holly Chase-Zugay

    Continuing the Building Your Financial House training, Session 2 focuses on money values, creating a money map, using mainstream banking products, minimizing taxes, and making money work through saving and investing. Only participants from Session 1 are invited to attend Session 2.

    Holly Chase-Zugay is a financial educator, writer, and presenter specializing in community-based financial education for adults.  She has worked with national, state, and local non-profit organizations and government agencies in the areas of financial education program development, training, outreach, and delivery.  Ms. Zugay has extensive experience with at-risk populations including, low-income families in subsidized housing, homeowners facing foreclosure, veterans transitioning from homelessness, ex-offenders preparing for re-entry, and people with disabilities.

    Ms. Zugay is currently the financial education officer with the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA).   In this capacity, she leads the financial literacy initiatives and training across the organization, including housing counseling and education, housing services, and mortgage servicing divisions.  Ms. Zugay designed PHFA’s flagship financial education program, Building Your Financial House. 

    Ms. Zugay holds a BS degree in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin and is a Certified Financial Planner™ certificant.  She is president of the Speyer Foundation and board member of the Capital Region Ex-offender Support Coalition and The Program, It’s About Change.  Ms. Zugay is the 2018 recipient of the Mary Ellen Edmonson Financial Educator of the Year awarded by the Association of Financial Counseling and Planning Education.

  • Overview of Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Program – Lolly Bentch

    This session will provide important information on the Commonwealth’s high quality, efficient and compliant Medical Marijuana program; covering its vision, mission, and guiding principles.  Our presentation illustrates how those suffering with serious medical conditions are provided access to medical marijuana though a safe and effective method of delivery. The key learning objectives for each participant are to understand the Medical Marijuana Act of 2016 as well as the roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders. The presentation focuses on how patients, caregivers, and physicians access the program in addition to the production, distribution, and acquisition of medical marijuana.

    Latrisha “Lolly“Bentch is the Patient Liaison for the Office of Medical Marijuana, in the Department of Health. She has been with this office since October of 2016, not long after the Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Act was signed into law. Her role as Patient Liaison is to ensure the voices of patients and caregivers are heard and to ensure their needs are met to the best of her ability as the Medical Marijuana program continues to evolve. 

    Previously, Lolly directed the efforts of the grassroots organization, Campaign4Compassion, which was the group of patients and caregivers who, with the support of key legislators, and the Wolf Administration, spearheaded the campaign to bring medical marijuana to fruition in Pennsylvania. 

    Lolly began her work advocacy in the Fall of 2013, on behalf of her young daughter who, at the time, suffered from intractable epilepsy. Lolly is always eager to share about her family’s journey with Medical Marijuana. 

  • Intergenerational Poverty Approach, Session 2

    Changing Organizational Culture - The Tools in our Toolbox that helped us Build
    2-Generation Capacity

    We will share the ups and downs of a major shift from Service Delivery to Human
    Development. We will delve into developing new tools to help smooth the transition
    and how data was collected and analyzed.

Session C: Wednesday, October 9, 2:30PM—4:00PM

  • Conducting Legally Sound Background Checks - Rick Pins

    Improper conduct by employees and volunteers can result in serious liability for grant-funded organizations. Background checks can help protect organizations, but these checks can themselves be a source of liability if not conducted properly. During this session, you will learn the right way to conduct background checks as well as unsound (and even illegal) procedures to be avoided. Make sure that your organization is conducting legally sound background checks by attending this workshop.

  • Building Your Financial House, Session 3 – Holly Chase-Zugay

    The final installment of Building Your Financial House, this session addresses risk management, insurance products, consumer safety, borrowing money, and debt management. Participants will also receive information on bringing the program to clients either through their own facilitation or community organizations already providing financial education in their local area. Only participants from Sessions 1 and 2 are invited to attend Session 3.

    Holly Chase-Zugay is a financial educator, writer, and presenter specializing in community-based financial education for adults.  She has worked with national, state, and local non-profit organizations and government agencies in the areas of financial education program development, training, outreach, and delivery.  Ms. Zugay has extensive experience with at-risk populations including, low-income families in subsidized housing, homeowners facing foreclosure, veterans transitioning from homelessness, ex-offenders preparing for re-entry, and people with disabilities.

    Ms. Zugay is currently the financial education officer with the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA).   In this capacity, she leads the financial literacy initiatives and training across the organization, including housing counseling and education, housing services, and mortgage servicing divisions.  Ms. Zugay designed PHFA’s flagship financial education program, Building Your Financial House. 

    Ms. Zugay holds a BS degree in chemistry from the University of Wisconsin and is a Certified Financial Planner™ certificant.  She is president of the Speyer Foundation and board member of the Capital Region Ex-offender Support Coalition and The Program, It’s About Change.  Ms. Zugay is the 2018 recipient of the Mary Ellen Edmonson Financial Educator of the Year awarded by the Association of Financial Counseling and Planning Education.

  • FASB Standards Update - Kay Sohl

    While you may not typically associate the words “accounting standards” with images of radical change, the accounting world is a buzz with the excitement of new rules for accounting and financial reporting for nonprofits that are now in full force (and frustration) thanks to new guidance from the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

    Learn what you’re supposed to already be doing to meet the new GAAP standards for distinguishing restricted and unrestricted grants, handling board designations, and disclosing whether you will have enough cash available to meet your operating needs throughout the next year. Master the challenging new distinctions between conditions and restrictions, and even more challenging distinctions between revenues and contributions. Learn how other CAAs are using the new standards to improve the usefulness of their financial reports and help Board members and funders understand their financial health.

    Kay Sohl has provided training and consultation for Executive Directors, CFOs, and Boards of Directors of over 7,500 nonprofit organizations throughout the United States. Kay focuses her work on rethinking nonprofit strategies for financial sustainability, Board financial oversight, compliance with federal funds management requirements, and the challenges of nonprofit accounting and financial reporting. She is a frequent presenter for state and regional coalitions of nonprofit human service providers.

    Kay has worked extensively community action agencies across the country and in the Northwest, CAPLAW, and the Community Action Partnership. She has authored multiple financial management toolkits for CAAs and other nonprofits, including resources for cost allocation, financial reporting, dashboard development, and the Uniform Guidance.

    Kay founded and lead TACS (Technical Assistance for Community Services) now known as the Nonprofit Association of Oregon, the northwest’s largest and most comprehensive capacity building resource for community based nonprofit organizations. She is co-author of the Oregon Nonprofit Corporation Handbook, an 800 page guide to legal, financial, and governance requirements and strategies for nonprofit organizations. Now in its 5th edition, the Handbook has sold over 11,000 copies and is a must-have resource for founders, board members, managers, and funders of nonprofit organizations.

  • Intergenerational Poverty Approach, Session 3

    Sustaining a 2-Generation Approach: Where are we now?

    We will provide examples of methods to help sustain the 2-Gen effort and to keep it
    fresh and current for the families we serve!

Session D: Thursday, October 10, 9:30AM—11:00AM

  • From "Bench Warmers” to “Starters”: Building and Maintaining a High-Performing Workforce - WiseCAP Team

    What is your Community Action Agency’s talent management strategy? Join us as we discuss ways to build a consistent leadership pipeline and foster a healthy workplace culture. We will discuss holding staff accountable for meeting current needs while also preparing them to meet future organizational demands. We will provide examples of ways to invest in staff performance, encourage employee strengths, assess employee skills, and create a culture of feedback that empowers CAA leaders to build a stronger team.

    Bertha Proctor, EdD, SPHR, SHRM-SCP, CCAP: Bertha is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Head Start Director at Pace Community Action Agency. She is also a Lead Consultant for WiseCAP Training & Consulting. Certified as a Senior Human Resource Professional, she serves on various boards, conducts state and national trainings, and has served as an adjunct faculty member at local universities. She also has developed and implemented a variety of management systems and business initiatives. Leadership training and staff development are her forte and stem from her advanced education in Communications, Human Resource Development, and Educational Leadership.

    Tai Blythe, MS, SHRM-CP, CCAP: Tai Blythe is a consultant at WiseCAP Consulting and also serves as Pace Community Action Agency’s Associate Director handling agency communications and working within the Head Start and Early Head Start Programs.  She is certified as a Human Resource Professional and has also served as a adjunct professor. She has worked with a variety of non-profit organizations that include hospitals and youth development programs. Tai has also worked with Fortune 500 companies in developing employee wellness initiatives, workplace safety, smoking cessation and parenting classes. She holds a Master’s in Leadership Development and a Bachelor's in Psychology with a minor in Sociology.

    Lori A. Williams, CCAP: Lori has dedicated her entire career to Community Action. She was introduced to the network over 35 years ago through an on-the-job training program.  She attended Vincennes University and is a graduate of the National Community Action Management Academy and Executive Development Institute. She is also a Certified Pathways to Excellence Reviewer.

    Lori is a consultant at WiseCAP Consulting and currently serving as Associate Director at Pace Community Action Agency, her focus is on program management and process optimization.  She oversees CSBG Programs and social enterprise businesses. Lori previously held positions of Controller and Chief Operating Officer.  She also serves as Treasurer for the Southwestern Indiana Workforce Development Board.

  • Six Thinking Hats for a more Creative, Collaborative, Effective, and Efficient Organization - Pat Carlisle, Dan Jurman, and Corinna Wilson

    If you want to unleash the creativity of your team, reduce conflict in your organization, and streamline decision making, this session will provide you with an introduction to an innovative and transformative set of tools that is used by over 800,000 organizational leaders and managers worldwide in hundreds of organizations.

     

    Thinking is a skill, one that can be taught and should be practiced. And all organizations – perhaps especially nonprofits and social service agencies -- are in desperate need of new ways of thinking about new ways of succeeding.  

     

    Six Thinking Hats is a simple, effective parallel thinking process that helps people be more productive, focused, and mindfully involved. A powerful tool set which once learned can be applied immediately!


    This session is a blend of presentation and audience participation and interaction. It will provide participants with an overview of the powerful Six Thinking Hats method, which encourages creativity, collaboration, and open-mindedness in our day-to-day work. The tools are incredibly effective and efficient; the system is designed to reduce the time spent in meetings but exponentially increase the creative output!

     

    For chief staff executives, managers, frustrated team members, and Board members, Six Thinking Hats is often a godsend, providing a way to remove emotion and personality from important decision making and bring efficiency and consensus to the process.

     

    Bios:

     

    This session will be led by de Bono James P. Carlisle (“Pat”), president of The de Bono Group, LLC, Dan Jurman, Chief Executive Officer of Community Partnership of Lancaster County, and Corinna Wilson, President of \Wilson500, Inc. and a certified Six Thinking Hats trainer.

    Pat has been recognized for his extensive and successful teaching and training of the widely acclaimed de Bono Thinking™ methods. As one of the first twelve Master Trainers, personally certified by Dr. Edward de Bono, and one of twelve certified creativity facilitators world-wide, Mr. Carlisle brings a special perspective of experience in his program and process leadership.

    Pat’s company, the de Bono Group, LLC, is a world leader in the delivery, design and effective results of de Bono design methods (which includes Six Thinking Hats and several other, more advanced tools), which are used by over 800,000 managers worldwide in hundreds of companies and organizations and have a proven track record in a variety of organizational settings.

    Dan Jurman has been the chief executive officer of Community Action Partnership of Lancaster County since July 1, 2015. He got his start in nonprofit work over 30 years ago providing summer enrichment programing to at-risk youth in places like Camden, Newark and Atlantic City. He has a Bachelor’s Degree from Rowan University and a Master’s Degree from Lancaster Theological Seminary, where he is now pursuing his Doctorate. He is a member of multiple boards throughout the community connected to housing, public health, workforce development and poverty alleviation. In addition to his volunteer roles, Dan is also an adjunct professor at the Penn State Hershey Department of Public Health Sciences and at Lancaster Theological Seminary where he co-teaches a class on the intersection between Theology and Poverty.

    Corinna is the president of Wilson500, Inc., a Harrisburg-based consulting firm offering a variety of services, including training, strategic planning, government relations, project management, public relations, and fundraising to a wide range of clients including the Central Pennsylvania Food Bank, Widener University Commonwealth Law School, Hunger-Free Lancaster County, Committee of Seventy, Feeding Pennsylvania, and Deloitte Consulting Pennsylvania.  A complete list of the firm’s clients is available at www.Wilson500.com. 

    Dr. Edward de Bono is a Nobel Prize nominee in Economics and world-renowned for his development and origination of the creative and constructive design thinking tools for parallel and creative thinking.

     

  • Negotiating and Fine-Tuning Indirect Cost Rates - Kay Sohl

    Is your Community Action Agency recovering the full cost of providing your services – including the cost of providing effective management- from each of your funding agreements?  If you’re not sure the answer is yes – and especially if you’re certain the answer is no - it may be time to take a fresh look at your approaches to cost allocation and/or negotiating your indirect cost rate and/or using the 10% de minimis rate allowed under the Uniform Guidance. This session focuses on four options for recovering administrative and other indirect costs from agreements which include federal dollars, providing tools to test the pros and cons of changing your approach on this thorny topic.

    Kay Sohl has provided training and consultation for Executive Directors, CFOs, and Boards of Directors of over 7,500 nonprofit organizations throughout the United States. Kay focuses her work on rethinking nonprofit strategies for financial sustainability, Board financial oversight, compliance with federal funds management requirements, and the challenges of nonprofit accounting and financial reporting. She is a frequent presenter for state and regional coalitions of nonprofit human service providers.

    Kay has worked extensively community action agencies across the country and in the Northwest, CAPLAW, and the Community Action Partnership. She has authored multiple financial management toolkits for CAAs and other nonprofits, including resources for cost allocation, financial reporting, dashboard development, and the Uniform Guidance.

    Kay founded and lead TACS (Technical Assistance for Community Services) now known as the Nonprofit Association of Oregon, the northwest’s largest and most comprehensive capacity building resource for community based nonprofit organizations. She is co-author of the Oregon Nonprofit Corporation Handbook, an 800 page guide to legal, financial, and governance requirements and strategies for nonprofit organizations. Now in its 5th edition, the Handbook has sold over 11,000 copies and is a must-have resource for founders, board members, managers, and funders of nonprofit organizations.

  • Fundraising Myths, Metrics and Magic - Catherine Crooker

    As Community Action Agencies strive for innovative approaches to meet client needs, adding private philanthropy to the mix brings benefits beyond just a new income stream. Through effective fundraising, you build a network of advocates who help you raise awareness about issues of poverty.

    As a former Community Action Director of Advancement herself, Catherine will help us explore the most effective ways to begin a fundraising program in a CAP agency, ways to increase results in a fledging program, and how to build the kind of deep, meaningful relationships with donors that produce results not just for today, but for the long-term.  Uncover commonly held myths that threaten to lead you and your board down a less productive path, discover the key metrics that indicate you are on the right track, and learn how to create the “magic” of private philanthropy by connecting with the caring donors who are ready to help you create hope, help and change for your clients.

    In this session, you will learn the keys to getting a Community Action fundraising program off the ground: where do we get the seed money, where do we find our first donors? You will gain the essential elements of a successful long-term strategy in a Community Action context, such as effective use of the tri-partite board. Finally, you will discover how to create the first high-level outline of a development plan, whether your first or an enhancement to an existing plan, so you have a road map to get you started.

    Catherine has served as a development and marketing leader since 1985, creating success for organizations large and small in multiple sectors.  She excels at creating innovative strategies, and inspiring staff, volunteers and boards to achieve audacious goals.

    Catherine has worked at organizations of all sizes, including Community Action of Washington County, Oregon, raising millions of dollars to help address issues of hunger and homelessness, find cures to cancer and heart disease, and educate our next generation of leaders.  Much of her career was spent in higher education where she helped create successful annual and capital campaigns at organizations including the University of Portland, Pacific University and Lewis & Clark College.

    Catherine’s experience in large and small organizations lends her a unique set of skills.  She is trained in the best practices of major gift fundraising inside large capital campaigns and uses her creative abilities to bring those vital tools to organizations with small staffs and limited budgets.

    Catherine is blessed to work with clients around the country. When not helping organizations achieve their fundraising dreams, she is probably hiking near her Sandwich, New Hampshire home, or sitting at her spinning wheel with friends in Portland, Oregon.

Session E: Thursday, October 10, 11:00AM—12:30PM

  • ALICE - The Hidden Population - Kristen Rotz and Maggie Livelsberger

    Far too often, we hear about the struggles of affording the everyday needs of a household. Between rising health care costs, lack of access to affordable child care, and the other essentials of housing, food, etc., many families throughout Pennsylvania are finding themselves in financial hardship, even with all available adults working. ALICE® stands for Asset-Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. These are our neighbors, friends and family who may earn more than the official poverty level, but still can’t afford all the basics for their family. United Way of Pennsylvania undertook a study to determine how many Pennsylvania households are in this hidden population and what they may need to support their journey to financial stability. This session will present the ALICE Report findings, to show ALICE lives in each county and play a vital role to the Commonwealth’s economy. Further, the session will examine what it takes to afford the basic necessities of a household budget throughout the state and how local United Ways will be using the information to inform their work within communities.

    Kristen Rotz, who began her position as President of the United Way of Pennsylvania in October 2014, is an experienced nonprofit association leader.  Kristen believes United Way is integral in bringing key stakeholders together from every sector, every political philosophy and every walk of life to help weave the fabric of healthy communities which offer opportunity for all. She has advocated for many human services programs throughout her career, and understands how to influence policy in Harrisburg.

    Prior to working for United Way of Pennsylvania, Kristen served as executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of County Administrators of Mental Health and Developmental Services. Before that, she was Government Relations Manager for the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania and Regulatory Reform Director for the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.

    During her career, Kristen has helped to shape changes to state law and regulations for a variety of issues ranging from how county human services are funded to alternative energy credits and  tax assessment for farms and forestland. As an executive of two membership organizations, she led these nonprofits through significant changes that have improved their financial standing and service to members.

    Kristen earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Communication Studies from Lynchburg College and a Master of Science in Organizational Development and Leadership from Shippensburg University. 

    Maggie Livelsberger began her career with United Way of Pennsylvania in December 2015 as the Public Policy and Communications Associate and was promoted to Director of Public Policy in 2018. Maggie is a passionate human services advocate, with a special interest in early learning and financial stability. She is committed to leading effective policy change for Pennsylvanians through cross-sector collaborations. Throughout her career, Maggie has worked on numerous advocacy campaigns to bring positive changes to the state’s most vulnerable populations.  

    Prior to working for United Way of Pennsylvania, Maggie served as the Government Relations and Outreach Coordinator at the Pennsylvania Beer Alliance and a Legislative Fellow with the PA House of Representatives Education Committee. 

    Maggie earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from The Pennsylvania State University and a Master of Arts in Public Administration, with a concentration in Policy Analysis and Evaluation. In May 2019, she completed her Master of Science in Management, concentrating in nonprofit management, at the University of Maryland Global Campus.  

  • Department of Community and Economic Development Presentation

    Our DCED staff look forward to hearing your thoughts as they present updates on directives, including monitoring and risk assessment. They will review documentation changes for the Organizational Standards and highlight changes in COPOS.

  • Raising Up the Next Generation of Fiscal Directors - Kay Sohl

    A new generation of CFOs and finance staff is taking the lead to tackle increasingly complex CAA funding models and sustainability challenges. Demands on today’s CFO/ Finance Director go way beyond the basics – an excellent knowledge of accounting principles, Uniform Guidance expertise, and mastery of specific funding source compliance issues.  Today’s Finance Directors must be ready and able to be true strategic partners with their Executive Director. 

    This session will explore skills and strategies needed to:

    • Build Board, Executive Director, and managers’ understanding of overall agency financial health and sustainability challenges
    • Cope with cash flow challenges amidst delays and uncertainties
    • Manage beyond the finance department – HR, IT, facilities, compliance functions
    • Streamline fiscal functions to make useful financial info available quickly

    Kay Sohl has provided training and consultation for Executive Directors, CFOs, and Boards of Directors of over 7,500 nonprofit organizations throughout the United States. Kay focuses her work on rethinking nonprofit strategies for financial sustainability, Board financial oversight, compliance with federal funds management requirements, and the challenges of nonprofit accounting and financial reporting. She is a frequent presenter for state and regional coalitions of nonprofit human service providers.

    Kay has worked extensively community action agencies across the country and in the Northwest, CAPLAW, and the Community Action Partnership. She has authored multiple financial management toolkits for CAAs and other nonprofits, including resources for cost allocation, financial reporting, dashboard development, and the Uniform Guidance.

    Kay founded and lead TACS (Technical Assistance for Community Services) now known as the Nonprofit Association of Oregon, the northwest’s largest and most comprehensive capacity building resource for community based nonprofit organizations. She is co-author of the Oregon Nonprofit Corporation Handbook, an 800 page guide to legal, financial, and governance requirements and strategies for nonprofit organizations. Now in its 5th edition, the Handbook has sold over 11,000 copies and is a must-have resource for founders, board members, managers, and funders of nonprofit organizations.

  • Beyond the Annual Fund: Major Gifts for Community Action Agencies - Catherine Crooker

    Don’t despair, you and your CAP agency DO have the potential to attract the right donors so you can raise the major gifts that will help you achieve your vision! Whether you are contemplating your first major gift program, or are in your third capital campaign, come learn how to build from the great work you have already done creating your current donor pool, and learn how to tap into the valuable relationships unique to YOUR organization so you can grow your circles. By combining tried and true practices, such as wealth screenings, with powerful engagement tools to get your volunteers and board involved, you WILL find the donors who help you improve your community.

    In this session, you will learn how to effectively apply the results of industry-standard tools, such as wealth screenings, in your program. You will also learn powerful ways to move beyond the wealth screening and engage your board, volunteers and other loyal donors to help you expand your circles and reach new prospects. You will leave this session with specific tools, sets of questions and methods you can apply in your own organization to actively engage your volunteers and move your major gifts program to the next level.

    Catherine has served as a development and marketing leader since 1985, creating success for organizations large and small in multiple sectors.  She excels at creating innovative strategies, and inspiring staff, volunteers and boards to achieve audacious goals.

    Catherine has worked at organizations of all sizes, including Community Action of Washington County, Oregon, raising millions of dollars to help address issues of hunger and homelessness, find cures to cancer and heart disease, and educate our next generation of leaders.  Much of her career was spent in higher education where she helped create successful annual and capital campaigns at organizations including the University of Portland, Pacific University and Lewis & Clark College.

    Catherine’s experience in large and small organizations lends her a unique set of skills.  She is trained in the best practices of major gift fundraising inside large capital campaigns and uses her creative abilities to bring those vital tools to organizations with small staffs and limited budgets.

    Catherine is blessed to work with clients around the country. When not helping organizations achieve their fundraising dreams, she is probably hiking near her Sandwich, New Hampshire home, or sitting at her spinning wheel with friends in Portland, Oregon.